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Oct 20, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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First Look: Privado in The Loop

October 19th, 2017

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Privado, the new weekend-only tasting menu concept from chef-owner Mike Randolph opens  tomorrow, Oct. 20, bringing a fine-dining experience to the Delmar Loop.

Privado is located at 6665 Delmar Blvd., in the space that once housed Randolph’s Italian restaurant, Randolfi’s, which closed last month. As The Scoop reported in September, Privado is reservations-only, offers one tasting menu (usually between 12 and 15 courses) and has a single seating on Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Only 16 seats are available per service.

The menu changes constantly, giving Randolph a unique chance to experiment with a wide variety of flavors and ingredients. It also gives diners a different culinary experience each time they visit.

The restaurant’s interior has been tweaked a bit since the Randolfi’s era to enhance the new concept. Two community tables now sit directly in front of the open kitchen for a full view of the action. An LED light mounted in shadowboxes above each seat create the perfect spotlight (and phone-friendly photo lighting) for each dish.

The kitchen has been streamlined for service with new workstations and shelving, though the signature wood-fired oven remains (as does the poster of “Born In The U.S.A”-era Bruce Springsteen). The front of the space, which used to serve as the main dining room, is available for private events during the week.

For those who want to stop by Privado for a drink and a bite, the bar area is available for walk-ins and reservations. A small a la carte food menu is available, as well as a drinks list that includes four classic cocktails, four rotating cocktails, plus a limited selection of beer, wine and spirits. The bar menu incorporates ingredients that appear on the tasting room bill of fare and includes an appetizer, two pastas, an entree and a dessert.

Tickets for each seating are available online in two-month blocks – October is already sold out, and November and December are starting to fill up. Here’s a first look at what to expect from Randolph’s newest project:

 

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Photos by Caitlin Lally 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Mike Randolph will open Privado in former Randolfi’s space

• Randolfi’s will close in The Loop Sept. 9

• Best New Restaurants: No. 1 – Público

Recipe: Grilled Pizza

October 18th, 2017

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There are three commandments you must follow to achieve flame-kissed, grilled pizza nirvana that no conventional oven-baked pie will ever reach.

No. 1: Control thy heat. Charcoal imparts the best flavor, but it can be a pain to manage until you get the hang of it. Patience is the secret ingredient to this exercise. Don’t be discouraged by a burnt crust or two at the beginning; this is an art, not a science. Hitting that perfect level of crispy char is unlikely to happen on the first try. Watch your dough like a hawk, peaking at the underside and readjusting its position to avoid flare-ups. And keep a spare crust at hand to replace any blackened beyond salvation.

No. 2: Preparation is key. All toppings for a grilled pizza should be prepped and ready near the grill. Once the crust is charred on one side, you need to move quickly to pile on all the ingredients. Go with cooked meats and chopped vegetables, a raw sauce I’ve included in this recipe and shredded mozzarella (thick slices won’t work). The toppings only have a few precious minutes to melt and fuse together into gooey deliciousness during the finishing stage.

No. 3: Keep it simple. You don’t have to make dough from scratch, but don’t buy a precooked crust either. Raw pizza dough is must to get a satisfying puffy and blistered crisp crust. A 16-ounce dough ball at Trader Joe’s will set you back about $1.50. “Less is more” should also be your credo while fashioning these crispy crusts on the super-hot grill. Apply sauces with a light hand. Toppings should be sufficient to cover the crust, but not overwhelm and create a soggy mess.

 

 
Grilled Pizza
2 pizzas

1 28-oz. can whole peeled San Marzano tomatoes, drained
4 cloves chopped garlic
1 tsp. kosher salt
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp. dried oregano
2 1-lb. balls pizza dough
½ cup olive oil
12 oz. shredded mozzarella
Desired toppings (pepperoni, ham, cooked Italian sausage, olives, chopped bell pepper, sliced mushrooms, artichoke hearts, etc.)
Handful chopped basil, for garnish

• In a mixing bowl, thoroughly crush the tomatoes with your hands, then mix in the garlic, salt, pepper and oregano. Set aside.
• Roll out each piece of dough to the desired shape and thickness. Let rest at room temperature 30 minutes.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for medium-high heat. Preheat 10 minutes.
• Brush each crust with 2 tablespoons olive oil and place each oil side-down on a sheet of foil. Working 1 pizza a time, place the foil over direct heat and grill 1 to 2 minutes, until the dough starts to bubble and set, checking the bottom occasionally to prevent burning. While it grills, brush the top of the crust with 2 tablespoons olive oil.
• Flip the crust onto the grate over direct heat and remove the aluminum foil. Quickly top the pizza with 9 ounces pizza sauce, 6 ounces cheese and desired toppings.
• Slide the pizza to indirect heat, cover and grill 10 minutes, until the cheese has melted. Repeat with the remaining pizza crust.
• Remove from the grill, garnish with basil and let rest 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.

 

Matt Berkley is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

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Twisted Ranch will move to larger space in Soulard

October 18th, 2017

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After just a little more than two years in business, Twisted Ranch will soon move to a new, larger location just a block away. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, the ranch dressing-themed eatery, located at 1730 S. Eighth St., will relocate to 1731 S. Seventh St., the former home of Soulard Restaurant & Bar, which closed earlier this year after a fire.

Twisted Ranch co-owner Jim Hayden said he hopes to make the move sometime in January. He said the new space, including the outdoor dining area, is almost three times larger than Twisted Ranch’s current location, and though the layout isn’t complete, he estimated there would be approximately 120 seats.

Twisted Ranch was the subject of a BuzzFeed video this summer that Hayden said caused an “exponential” increase in business. “We struggle with wait times right now, so it’ll be nice to let people in a little quicker,” he said.

The move not only means more space for seats, but a significantly larger kitchen as well.

“The current kitchen is so tiny. With a larger, properly functioning kitchen, with space for storage and prepping, we will be expanding the menu,” Hayden said. “We may not do that day one, we might transition with the current menu and work out the kinks and then get some more options available.”

He said he doesn’t foresee the transition interrupting service significantly.

“We are going to attempt to stay open as much as possible [during the move],” he said. “There’s a chance we’ll have to be closed for a day or two, but it should be a pretty easy move.”

Photo by Elizabeth Maxson

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Review: Twisted Ranch

• Ranch dressing-themed restaurant to open in Soulard

• Hit List: 3 new restaurants to try this September 

 

 

Spring 2018 Editorial Internship – Apply Now!

October 17th, 2017

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Attention journalism, communications and English students: Sauce Magazine is seeking Editorial Interns for spring 2018.

 

We need students with a passion for the St. Louis food scene who want to translate that love to print and online media. As a Sauce Editorial Intern, you will:

-Assist Sauce editorial team with the production of the monthly print publication and daily online products. Duties include, but are not limited to, reporting, conducting interviews, writing articles for The Scoop, fact checking, assisting with research for upcoming articles, interview transcription, etc.
-Attend occasional events and tastings with the Sauce editorial team, gaining real-world experience as a food journalist.
-Hone your reporting, writing and editing skills with the goal of producing published clips for use in future portfolios
-Perform other duties as assigned

 

The Sauce Editorial Intern must have:

-A passion for the St. Louis food scene and the written word
-A working knowledge of AP Style, grammar rules, Microsoft Office and Mac computer systems
-A working knowledge of various social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, etc.)
-Experience conducting phone interviews and writing news articles for print/online publication
-A personable and professional attitude in online, phone and written communication
-The ability to manage his or her time efficiently; should be a self-starter
-A reliable mode of transportation

This internship is unpaid; internship begins in mid-January and ends in early May. Scheduling is flexible, but the intern must be available 10 to 12 hours a week. Interested applicants may submit a cover letter, resume and three to five writing clips to Catherine Klene, Managing editor, digital, at cklene@saucemagazine.com. All resumes must be submitted no later than Nov. 15. No calls, please.

Recipe: Parsnip-Carrot Puree

October 17th, 2017

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This recipe was inspired by a parsnip side my husband ordered recently at The Crow’s Nest in Maplewood. When I told the owner how fantastic it was, she told me it would soon be off the menu, which meant it was even more important that I figure out how replicate it at home.

This dish will be prominently featured at our Thanksgiving table this year. I added carrots to the parsnips for a little color (and the whole “you never see rabbits wearing glasses” thing). I love this dish served silky smooth, but I respect that some people prefer a little texture in their mashes. You do you, Boo.

 

Peppery Parsnip-Carrot Puree
Inspired by a recipe from The Crow’s Nest
4 servings

2 cups (about 1 lb.) peeled, chopped parsnips
1 cup (about ½ lb.) peeled, chopped carrots
1 cup whole milk
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. butter
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. white pepper

• Place the parsnips, carrots, milk and garlic in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and slowly bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 8 minutes, until the vegetables are easily pierced with a fork.
• Carefully pour the vegetables and milk into a blender or bowl of a food processor fitted with the S-blade. Add the butter, black pepper, salt and white pepper and puree until the mixture reaches the desired smoothness. Adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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First Look: BLK MKT Eats in Midtown

October 13th, 2017

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St. Louis has danced with the dual sushi bowl and poke trends for years, but cousins Kati Fahrney and Ron Turigliatto have brought the first fast-casual sushi bowl and roll restaurant to St. Louis with BLK MKT Eats.

The restaurant, located at 9 S. Vandeventer Ave., across from Saint Louis University, opens for lunch Wednesday, Oct. 18.

As The Scoop reported in July, Turigliatto and Fahrney are first-time restaurant owner who turned their passion for home cooking and travel into a business. The former teachers traveled across the country exploring similar concepts and fine-tuning their menu.

The 1,000-square-foot space will operate primarily as a carryout operation with curbside pickup and delivery to come in the near future. Ravenous diners who can’t wait to get home can snack on the spot at a standing bar or one of four stools at the window.

The menu features a handful of items that can be served as a burrito-sized sushi rolls wrapped in thin sheets of nori or as bowls with greens, brown or white rice. Three items are also available as nachos served atop house-made wonton chips.

The cousins source their raw salmon and tuna from Seattle Fish five to six times a week and use it in a variety of items like the OG Fire, which includes the customer’s choice of salmon or tuna. The Swedish Fish showcases Fahrney’s cured salmon, a recipe she’s perfected over years of family Christmas Eve dinners.

Those squeamish about raw fish can try the Tasty As Cluck featuring buttermilk-fried chicken or the Seoul Delicious with grilled chicken. Vegans and vegetarians are not forgotten, either; the Holy Shiitake swaps meat and seafood for braised mushrooms.

BLK MKT Eats will be open Monday to Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from Midtown’s newest fast-casual spot:

 

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Editor’s Note: This article originally stated BLK MKT Eats received fish deliveries three to five times a week. It was updated at 4:45 p.m. with the correct information. 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• BLK MKT Eats will open next month in Midtown

• Build-your-own poke bowl spot Poke Doke will open in the CWE

• Poke: The Hawaiian classic that’s having a big moment

 

DTWE: Love it or hate it – pumpkin beer season is back

October 13th, 2017

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Leaves are turning and a slight chill has actually embraced the Midwest. Though we’re in for some fluctuating temperatures this weekend, the beer scene in St. Louis has been overwhelmingly autumnal this month – pumpkin beers are everywhere. However polarizing this style may be, there is no denying the creativity and diversity across this spiced beer spectrum.

1. Schlafly Pumpkin Ale
This 8-percent beauty –arguably the most sought-after local pumpkin beer in the city – just brought home a silver medal at the Great American Beer Festival last weekend. It’s truly a pumpkin pie in a glass with a rich sweetness that embraces spicy undertones of flavor dominated by clove, nutmeg and cinnamon.
Schlafly Tap Room and Schlafly Bottleworks, schlafly.com

2. Crown Valley Brewing Pumpkin Cider
21st Street Brewers Bar hosts its Pumpkin Beerfest all month, showcasing a pumpkin beer each Friday in October. Tonight, Oct. 13, 21st Street shines the spotlight on Crown Valley Pumpkin Cider. Sweet, spice and everything nice, this 5-percent cider is stacked full of ripe juicy apple and pumpkin bound together with balancing notes of allspice and pumpkin pie spice.
21st Street Brewers Bar, 21stbrew.com

3. Nebraska Brewing Wick for Brains
This seasonal amber ale is reminiscent of walking through a pumpkin patch in the middle of a fall afternoon. Soft fruit, melon and spice dominate the nose, while ripe, fresh pumpkin, grain and nuances of clove and nutmeg embrace the palate. On the subtler side for sweetness, this easy 6-percent drinker finishes a bit drier than most.
Randall’s Wine & Spirits, shoprandalls.com

 

Katie Herrera is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and account manager at Craft Republic. 

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Eat This: Vegetable Samosa at Everest Café & Bar

October 12th, 2017

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If you haven’t tried the Vegetables Samosa at Everest Café & Bar, it’s time to check your priorities. Deep golden-brown pyramids of house-made pastry are filled with velvety smashed potatoes studded with peas and onion and fragrant with coriander. The crunchy, tender pockets are perfectly seasoned and delightful on their own, but the accompanying red tamarind sauce adds a sweet, tangy highlight.

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Heather Hughes is managing editor at Sauce Magazine. 

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Recipe: Diwali Desserts

October 12th, 2017

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Hindus around the world light up the night next week during Diwali, the annual festival of lights that takes place Oct. 19 this year. The holiday celebrates good triumphing over evil and light overcoming darkness with firecrackers, homes decorated with elaborate designs of colored rice flour and flower petals, and an abundance of sweets.

Some of the fancier, heavier desserts include gulab jamun (milky doughnuts balls in sugar syrup), jalebi (chickpea-flour fritters also soaked in sugar syrup) or ras malai (cottage cheese dumplings steeped in milk syrup). You can purchase them, of course, but many Indians like to make lighter desserts at home and distribute them in boxes to family and friends.

Cows are considered holy in Hinduism, and many people in ancient times owned cows or had access to their milk. There are 150 or more milk-based desserts made for Diwali, and I’m sharing two of my South Indian family’s favorites.

Historically, most Indian homes didn’t have ovens (and many still don’t), so Diwali desserts are often made on the stovetop with lots of stirring and patience. Prior to the days of condensed milk, chefs it cooked down, which took hours of constant stirring. Now, the recipes are a bit more simplified but still require 20 to 30 minutes of stovetop mixing.

This results in lightly sweetened milky desserts, like burfi (also known by sandesh or peda depending on the region) adorned with some finely chopped pistachios or almonds. This burfi recipe is just a base. Many households adapt it to suit their family tradition, adding mango puree, saffron, cardamom or cocoa powder.

Another common dessert is yogurt-based pudding called shrikhand. This is typically made by straining whole-milk plain yogurt through cheesecloth for several hours, but my mother discovered that using Greek yogurt saves all that hassle. I’ve included her recipe for a lovely, sweetened shrikhand perfumed with cardamom and saffron.

 

 

Milk Burfi
20 to 30 pieces

Customize this recipe with your favorite flavors. Add ¼ cup mango puree or 3 tablespoons cocoa powder with the dairy at the beginning of the recipe, or mix a few strands of saffron or ¼ cup shredded sweetened coconut with the cardamom.

1 15-oz. package ricotta cheese
1 14-oz. can condensed milk
½ cup (1 stick) butter
½ tsp. cardamom ground
Handful pistachio or almond slivers

• Line a baking sheet with parchement paper.
• In a medium saucepan over medium heat, use a rubber spatula to constantly stir the ricotta, milk and butter 20 to 30 minutes until it comes together. Add the caradmon and reduce the heat to low.
• Place a small piece of dough on the baking sheet. If it does not shift of spread, transfer the dough onto the baking sheet. Use your hands or a rolling pin to roll the dough to ½-inch thickness.
• Use a cookie cutter to make shapes and decorate with pistachio and almond slivers, or use your hands to make small balls of dough, then flatten a bit between your palms. Make a small indentation in the center to fill with the pistachio or almond slivers.
• Refrigerate and serve chilled or at room temperature.

 

100917_diwali1

 

Shrikhand
6 to 8 servings

½ tsp. saffron
1 tsp. milk
1 32-oz. containter plain full-fat Greek yogurt
1 16-oz. container sour cream
¾ cup sugar
½ tsp. cardamom
Dried fruit or nuts like pistachios or almonds, for garnish (optional)

• Soak the saffron in the milk.
• In a large mixing bowl, beat the yogurt, sour cream and sugar on medium speed until the sugar dissolves and mixtures isn’t grainy.
• Add in the cardamom and the saffron and milk. Taste and adjust the spices and sugar as needed.
• Serve in bowls and top with dried fruit and nuts, if desired.

Photos by Amrita Song

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who blogs at A Song in Motion

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Four STL breweries medal at Great American Beer Festival

October 10th, 2017

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 { from left, Side Project bartender Megan Knaus, co-owner and brewer Cory King and brewer Tommy Manning; Perennial Artisan Ales co-owner Phil Wymore and brewer Chris Kinast } 

 

The St. Louis craft beer scene continues to be recognized at the national level. Four area breweries earned medals at this year’s Great American Beer Festival last weekend, Oct. 5 to Oct. 7, in Denver. GABF is one of the craft brewing industry’s largest annual events.

Perennial Artisan Ales took home two medals: a silver in the wood- and barrel-aged strong stout category for Maman 2017, and Perennial also took a bronze in the Belgian- and French-style ale category for Working Title. It’s a familiar feeling for the South City brewery; Perennial has picked up five other GABF honors, including a gold for its Savant Blanc in 2015.

“There were over 2,000 breweries that entered beers in the competition,” said Perennial co-owner Phil Wymore. “It’s a great honor, and St. Louis was really well represented.”

 

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{ Schalfly brand specialist Wil Rogers }

 

Charleville Brewing Co. garnered its second GABF win: a bronze medal for its Barrel-Aged Barleywine in the wood- and barrel-aged strong beer category. Charleville director of operations Tait Russell did not return requests for comment. Schlafly’s Pumpkin Ale won a silver medal in the pumpkin/squash beer or pumpkin spice beer category. This is the first GABF win the brewery.

“I think it’s a big deal for anyone who wins a medal there,” said Schlafly founding brewer Stephen Hale. “I would say collectively we’re feeling very good about it. “

Side Project Brewing’s Blended 2017 was awarded a silver medal in the Belgian-style lambic or sour ale category. It was also the first GABF honor for Side Project.

“The GABF is the largest U.S. competition,” said Side Project co-owner Cory King. “To be recognized for pretty much our bread and butter was really cool. We knew there’s be some serious competition in that category, and for ours to take second was pretty awesome.”

Photos courtesy of Perennial Artisan Ales and Schlafly 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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