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Aug 26, 2016
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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The Scoop: Intoxicology spirits and bar supply store to open in The Grove

August 25th, 2016

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A new cocktail supply and spirits shop is coming to The Grove this fall. Intoxicology will open doors at 4321 Manchester Ave., next door to Layla. The 1,600-square-foot shop will focus on cocktail mixers and accessories for the home bar, including shrubs, bitters, artisan spirits and vintage glassware. The space will also feature a tasting bar, so people will be able to try before they buy.

Co-owners Andy Foerstel and Melissa Pfeiffer are bringing their retail and restaurant experience together to make the dream a reality. Foerstel has been working in retail and merchandising for years. “I’ve done a little bartending, too, and entered in some competitions before,” he said. “Melissa comes from CJ Muggs and brings about 23 years of customer service experience to the table.”

Both cocktail enthusiasts, they decided to open the shop after realizing that there wasn’t anywhere local to go for the specialty barware, mixers and supplies for their home bar.“We kept looking around for specialty things, and often had to go online to buy them,” Foerstel said. “We decided to open a store to make these things would be available locally.”

This is the second of two home supply stores that have announced locations in The Grove in recent weeks. Beth Styles of Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods said she will open her shop at 4180 Manchester Ave., this fall.

By the Book: Theo Chocolate by Debra Music and Joe Whinney

August 24th, 2016

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I have fond memories of baking cookies with my mother and my grandmother when I was a little girl. We made the basics: oatmeal raisin, peanut butter and chocolate chip – all excellent cookies, but sometimes I want something more decadent. Gooey Double-Chocolate Mocha cookies from Theo Chocolate: Recipes and Sweet Secrets from Seattle’s Favorite Chocolate Maker seemed to fit the bill.

I’m gluten-intolerant, and since these only called for cup flour, I thought I could safely use a gluten-free flour blend. I wanted a pure chocolate cookie, so I left out the ground coffee, which the introduction declared optional. While the cookies were deeply chocolaty, they also spread into thin, flat disks during baking. The recipe said they would be “very fragile,” but the accompanying photo showed thick, fudgy cookies, not the delicate wafers I created.

While the cookie were rich, they were not enough to win this round. I’ll definitely try this recipe again, though, altering my gluten-free flour ratio to try and make them more substantial.

Skill level: More advanced techniques require an intermediate ability in the kitchen.
This book is for: Chocolate lovers, of course
Other recipes to try: Preston Hill Bakery chocolate bread, almond-olive oil sable cookies with chocolate, Chocolate (Factory) Eton Mess, Tallulah’s warm chocolate pudding cake
The Verdict: The pie bars from Sweeter off the Vine came together better than my deflated chocolate cookies.

 

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Gooey Double-Chocolate Mocha Cookies
2 dozen cookies

10 oz. Theo 70-percent dark chocolate, chopped, divided
¼ cup (½ stick) unsalted butter
⅓ cup (1½ oz.) all-purpose flour
¼ tsp. kosher salt
¼ tsp. baking powder
1 Tbsp. finely ground Fair Trade coffee beans
2 eggs, at room temperature
¾ cup (5½ oz.) sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted (optional)

• Preheat the over to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.
• Melt 7 ounces of the chocolate with the butter in a double boiler (see instructions below) and set aside to cool slightly.
• Sift the flour, salt and baking powder together in a small bowl, stir in the coffee and set the bowl aside.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment (or in a bowl with a whisk by hand), whip the eggs and sugar together on medium speed until very thick and pale, 3 to 4 minutes (about 8 minutes by hand). Add the vanilla and mix well. Fold in the cooled chocolate mixture, then the dry ingredients, and finally the remaining 3 ounce chopped chocolate and the walnuts.
• Use 2 spoons or a small cookie scoop to drop rounded tablespoons of batter 2 inches apart onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake the cookies, one sheet at a time, until they’re puffed, shiny and cracked, 8 to 10 minutes. Let the cookies cool completely on the baking sheet. They will be very fragile.

Melting Chocolate in a Double Boiler
• Heat a couple inches of water in a saucepan over low heat. Put the chopped chocolate in a stainless steel or glass bowl large enough to sit securely in the saucepan without touching the water. When the water comes to a simmer, turn off the heat and let the chocolate begin to melt. Stir the chocolate often, and when about two-thirds of it has melted, remove the bowl from the saucepan and dry the bottom of the bowl very well. Continue to stir the chocolate until it has melted completely.

Reprinted with permission from Sasquatch Books

 

Edible Weekend: 2 more events to extend the weekend

August 24th, 2016

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There are plenty of ways to fill up this weekend: Need more? Extend your weekend with two Monday night dinners.

 

1. Tiki Dinner
Spice up your Monday with a Tiki Dinner at Mission Taco Joint in the Central West End. This six-course meal includes tropical cocktail pairings like tuna poke and volcano shrimp with Planter’s Punch and char sui short ribs with a Scorpion Bowl. Tickets available at the CWE location.
$60. Aug. 29 – 5 to 11 p.m., Mission Taco Joint, 398 N. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, 314.930.2955, Facebook: Night of Tiki 

 

2. Rosé and Tomato Dinner
Get your fill of amazing summer tomatoes while you still can at the Rosé and Tomato Dinner at Randolfi’s. Enjoy six-courses including a charred tomato risotto with a 2015 Yves Cuilleron Sybel Syrah Rosé, a cioppino-style dish with 2015 Bisson Portofino Ciliegiolo Rosé and a sungold tomato sorbet for dessert. Call for reservations.
$85. Mon., Aug. 29 – 5 to 9 p.m., Randolfi’s, 6665 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314.899.9221, Facebook: Rosé & Tomato Dinner 

 

Still hungry? Sign up for the Edible Weekend newsletter to get the best food events of the weekend delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

 

The Scoop: Shack to open third location in Chesterfield

August 23rd, 2016

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Good news for early risers in Chesterfield: Pancakes, omelet and hashbrown skillets will soon be served at a third location of Shack, opening in October at 14810 Clayton Road.

Owner Brant Baldanza said he is “super excited” to bring an outpost of his breakfast and lunch restaurant to the town where he grew up. He thinks the location – formerly home to a Lester’s – has a “vacancy for breakfast,” and he hopes to attract diners from Wildwood, Ballwin and Chesterfield Valley.

The restaurant will have the same hours (breakfast 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily, lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday) and menu as its sister Shack in Frontenac, and all three locations will start serving a few new dishes in October.

There may be more Shacks springing up in the near future. Baldanza plans to expand his restaurant concept in the St. Louis market and hopes to open two or three more locations next year, with possible openings in St. Charles, St. Peters and Edwardsville. He’s looking for neighborhoods with high schools, churches and young communities with growing families. “Every Saturday and Sunday, we have lots of family breakfasts,” he said.

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

August 21st, 2016

From a new kitchen supply shop on Manchester to a new doughnut shop in Tulsa, Oklahoma, here’s what went down in the STL food scene last week, ICYMI.

 

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1. If you need a tart pan, Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods will surely have them stocked when it opens in The Grove at 4180 Manchester Ave., this fall. Why? Owner Beth Styles’ missing tart pan sparked the idea for her kitchen supply store.

2. Strange Donuts will be no stranger in Tulsa, Oklahoma next spring when it sets up shop at the north corner of East Archer Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

 

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3. Sarah’s Cake Shop owner Jill Umbarger attempted to quietly open Sarah’s on Central at 127 N. Central Ave., in Eureka last Wednesday, Aug. 10, and was met with a line out the door.

4. This fall, Chris’ Pancakes & Dining will take its breakfast game downtown to a new location, Chris’ @ The Docket, at 100 N. Tucker Blvd.

 

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5. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Eastern Missouri will open Anew, a ground-floor restaurant and rooftop event space, at 501 N. Grand Blvd.

 

 

Drink This Weekend Edition: 3 brews older than the St. Louis World’s Fair

August 19th, 2016

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The St. Louis World’s Fare kicks off tonight at the World’s Fair Pavilion in Forest Park and lasts through the weekend. While we celebrate the significance of that historic 1904 event, I wanted to pay homage to international brewing tradition. In this day and age experimentation and adjunct-crazy recipe building, it’s good to step back and salute the foundation on which the modern brewing scene was built. These three beers were enjoyed during the 1904 World’s Fair – and decades (or even centuries) before. Raise a glass to history, St. Louis, and nerd out!

 

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1. Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier (5.4 percent ABV)
Highlighting Bavaria’s importance to beer culture, Weihenstephan Monastery stands as the oldest brewery in the world, originating in 1040 in Freising, Germany. Its Weiss beer is the granddaddy of all Weiss beers. A heavy wheat malt bill allows for a billowy body and clean canvas for that well-known Hefeweizen yeast expression. Look for intense notes of clove and banana on the aroma, a palate that follows suit with soft spice and banana and a crisp, lightly bitter finish.

2. Original Ritterguts Gose (4.7 percent ABV)
Goses have been incredibly trendy in the American beer scene these past few years, but the style itself isn’t new. Born in 1824, Ritterguts Gose is the oldest currently brewed gose in the world. A wheat beer that boasts lactic tartness, salt and coriander, it’s a refreshing treat and a great introduction to the world of sour beers.

3. Pilsner Urquell (4.4 percent ABV)
This Bohemian delight is the result of a local protest in 1838 in Pilsen, Czech Republic, during which angry beer drinkers dumped 36 barrels of “spoiled” beer in front of the town hall. In an effort to compete with the Bavarian lagers introduced to the area, Pilsner Urquell was born in 1842 – a beautiful, medium-bodied lager with satiating bitterness that pairs well with the delicate bouquet of black pepper and floral notes from the Saaz hops.

 

All beers available at The Wine and Cheese Place

First Look: Sarah’s on Central in Eureka

August 19th, 2016

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Sarah’s Cake Shop owner Jill Umbarger attempted to quietly open Sarah’s on Central at 127 N. Central Ave., in Eureka last Wednesday, Aug. 10, and was met with a line out the door. As The Scoop reported in June, the new cafe adds breakfast and lunch fare to the usual desserts Sarah’s Cake Shop is known for.

For breakfast, visitors can choose from pastries, quiches, breakfast sandwiches and sweet or savory muffins. A dedicated toast menu features sweet and savory toppings including house-made jams on slices of Companion bread. For lunch, sandwiches, salads and soups are offered, and daily after-school specials are a weekday treat; right now, it’s $1 grilled cheese sandwiches.

“I’m from Eureka, so I’m excited to be here,” Umbarger said. “As soon as I saw (the space) was for sale, I knew I had to have it.” Sarah’s on Central is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Here’s what to expect when you walk in:

 

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky 

The Scoop: Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods to open in The Grove

August 19th, 2016

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If you need a tart pan, Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods will surely have them stocked when it opens in The Grove at 4180 Manchester Ave., this fall. Why? Owner Beth Styles’ missing tart pan sparked the idea for her kitchen supply store. With no nearby local shop near her house, she spent nearly an hour driving to and from an independent kitchen goods store.

“I started thinking, ‘Why don’t we a have a cool, really well stocked local resource in the city that has something for situations like these?” said Styles.

Her visits to kitchen supply stores around the country fed the idea, which she eventually shared with a few fellow St. Louis small business owners, including Rise Coffee owner Jessie Mueller. Mueller proposed Styles use Rise’s current location once Rise moves into a neighboring space.

“In a lot of other cities I’ve gone to, you see complementary businesses,” said Styles. “I just closed my eyes and I could see it in there. It just felt like the right fit.”

Styles, who also owns vintage clothing store Parsimonia, hopes to open Lemon Gem in November, pending when Rise moves next door. The lower level of the 1,300-square-foot space will be dedicated to retail. Lemon Gem (which is the name of an edible marigold variety) will carry basic cooking supplies from suppliers like OXO, Cuisinart, Microplane and Victorinox, artisan goods from local and regional craftspeople and items more geared toward gifts and decor. “We’re hoping to bring in some stuff that hasn’t been sold (in St. Louis) before and celebrate the maker,” Styles said.

Styles said she will alter little of the current interior decor or program. She plans to preserve the children’s area upstairs and add a community cookbook library with reading chairs. In the evening, the second floor will be available to hold events and workshops. “I want (Lemon Gem) to be a good local resource for the South City area in general, a good resource … for people for all cooking levels,” she said.

 

The Scoop: Strange Donuts to open Tulsa location

August 18th, 2016

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Strange Donuts will be no stranger in Tulsa, Oklahoma next spring when it sets up shop at the north corner of East Archer Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

“We’re ready for the company to expand, and I’ve been looking at Tulsa for a long time,” said owner Jason Bockman. “It has ambitious, cool people that want their city to be great, and I am excited to be a part of it.”

Bockman contacted the George Kaiser Foundation (which is renovating the Tulsa’s Brady Arts District) and fell in love with its work, which includes collaboration with Teach for America and the Tulsa Artist Fellowship. Bockman secured a 1,200-square-foot space in a 1920s warehouse currently being renovated into apartments and studios for the Tulsa Artist Fellowship.

The Tulsa location is the fourth for Strange; they also have shops in Maplewood, Kirkwood and Columbia, Missouri. It will be twice the size of Strange Donuts’  flagship Maplewood space. “St. Louis is really accustomed to grabbing your doughnuts and going home. It’s not like that in a lot of places,” Bockman said. “Tulsa is a lively city where people want to go out and be out.”

An expanded beverage program and a far-out interior will also invite patrons to linger. Bockman plans to serve an expanded beverage menu including coffee options, and has enlisted local firm Lilly Architects to make the interior “look like you’re in space.”

The Tulsa location is slated to open in March 2017. In the meantime, Bockman and his Strange squad are hosting pop-ups “to say this is who we are and to meet new friends,” which they will continue until opening day.

“I’m genuinely interested in being part of a community, not just selling people stuff,” said Bockman.

 

Just Five: Grilled Pound Cake and Apricots

August 17th, 2016

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This recipe was inspired last spring when I had the opportunity to work with Panorama chef Ivy Magruder on a multi-course meal themed around the French mother sauces. Riffing on that idea, we created a dish based on one of my mother’s special desserts: lemon pound cake. Now my mom’s version was not a fancy recipe – it required boxed mixes and a lot of eggs and oil. But Magruder elevated her classic dessert, grilling the pound cake and topping it with macerated fruit. The dish was a huge success.

Grilling pound cake adds texture, slight caramelization and beautiful, slightly charred spots. Summer is the perfect time to try variations on this dessert, and I wanted to play with apricots, as I’m most familiar with the dried version served on cheese plates. Fresh apricots, like figs, are delicate creatures, slightly tart and almost creamy when ripe. They hold up well on the grill, as do peaches, plums or nectarines. I also gilded this grilled lily with almond whipped cream, but feel free to swap for vanilla or mix in a spoonful of lemon curd to play up the fruit’s tart notes.

 

Grilled Pound Cake and Apricots
Inspired by a recipe from Panorama’s Ivy Magruder 
8 servings

1 pound cake, cut into 8 slices
4 ripe apricots, halved and pitted
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. pure almond extract

• Prepare a charcoal grill for high, direct heat and create a two-zone fire by moving the coals to one side. Alternately, preheat a gas grill for high, direct heat.
• Place the pound cake over direct heat and sear just until grill marks appear, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Flip and grill the other side, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove and set aside.
• Place the apricots cut-side down over direct heat and sear until grill marks appear, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Flip and place skin-side down over indirect heat or move to the upper tier of a gas grill. Cover and cook 1 minute, until the fruit is soft but not falling apart. Remove and set aside.
• In a chilled bowl, use a hand mixer on high speed to whip the cream until soft peaks form, about 2 minutes. Add the sugar and almond extract and whip 30 seconds to 1 minute until the cream has stiffened to your desired consistency.
• To serve, place a piece of grilled pound cake on each plate. Top each with an apricot half and a dollop of whipped cream. Serve immediately.

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