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Dec 14, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Recipe: Marble Peppermint Cake Pops

December 14th, 2017

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Everyone makes cookies at Christmas. While cake pops will never replace this tradition, they are a welcome departure from normal frosted sugar cookies. Cake pops are less fussy than a properly layered cake, and it’s a great activity for kids, too. The soft cake inside is gooey, and a white chocolate coating adds a crunch before it melts in your mouth.

I’m prone to saving all my cake scraps in the freezer and pulling them out for moments like these, but you can also make cupcakes or a simple cake, let it sit out overnight, then crumble it up in a bowl. I prefer to mix it with cream cheese because it cuts the sweetness from the chocolate coating, but any frosting you have on hand will do. The marbled look is fun, easy to do and makes a great presentation. Merry Christmas and happy holidays!

 

Marble Peppermint Cake Pops
24 to 30 pops

½ cup (1 stick) room-temperature butter
¾ cup sugar
2 room-temperature eggs
1 tsp. peppermint extract
1¼ cup flour
¼ cup sour cream
1 tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. baking soda
¼ tsp. kosher salt
4 oz. cream cheese
20 oz. white chocolate melting wafers
Green and red food coloring

Special equipment: 24 to 30 lollipop sticks

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with cupcake liners.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the butter and sugar on high speed until fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add the eggs and peppermint and beat to incorporate.
• Use a rubber spatula to fold in the flour, sour cream, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Evenly divide the batter among the 12 cupcake liners.
• Bake about 15 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into a cupcake comes out mostly clean with a few crumbs attached. Let cool completely.
• Remove the cupcakes from the muffin tin and let rest uncovered at room temperature, 1 day so they become slightly stale.
• Crumble the cupcakes into a large mixing bowl. Use your hands to mix in the cream cheese until the mixture is moldable. Roll pieces into 24 to 30 golf ball-sized pieces and place on a sheet tray. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
• Place the white chocolate in a glass bowl and microwave 30 seconds. Stir and microwave another 30 seconds, repeating until the chocolate is completely melted.
• Evenly divide half the melted chocolate into 2 small bowls; set the remaining melted chocolate aside. Add a few drops red food coloring to one small bowl and green to the other. Use forks to gently swirl the food coloring to create a marbled look, but don’t completely mix in.
• Dip 1 lollipop stick into the plain white chocolate, then slide the cake ball onto the stick. Dip the cake pops into a red or green marbled chocolate bowl and carefully turn to coat and transfer the marbled effect to the cake pop. Let any excess chocolate drip back into the bowl. Place the stick into a colander hole, piece of Styrofoam or a deep container of sugar to let the chocolate dry.
• Repeat with the remaining cake pops. You may need to melt and add color to more white chocolate to maintain the marbled look.
• Serve the cake pops immediately or store frozen in a zip-top bag up to 1 month. Thaw at room temperature 30 minutes before serving.

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

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• 14 cookie recipes to bake – and bake and bake – this holiday season

Recipe: Bubble Thyme

December 13th, 2017

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I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: two of my favorite words are “Champagne float.” Few things are fancier than a Champagne cocktail. It makes a lady feel more ladylike and a gent feel more debonaire. A recent “middle-aged brain” moment left me with more honey than I needed, and after my third cup of honey-sweetened tea, I decided a honey-based cocktail was in order.

While bourbon and honey was the most obvious choice, I took a risk to see what happened when honey and lemon met the piney taste of gin. Adding thyme was a natural bridge between these flavors. (I tried marjoram-infused honey syrup, but it just didn’t quite complement the flavors as nicely.) This is an easy and festive party cocktail. Top the drink with bubbly as you serve.

 

Bubble Thyme
2 servings

¼ cup honey
¼ cup water
2 sprigs fresh thyme, plus more for garnish
3 oz. gin
1½ oz. lemon juice
4 oz. Champagne or prosecco

• Make a thyme-infused honey syrup by combining the honey, water and thyme sprigs in a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Remove from heat and let cool.
• Strain into a jar with a lid; discard the thyme sprigs. Refrigerate up to 2 weeks.
• In a cocktail shaker filled with ice, combine the gin, lemon juice and 2 ounces honey syrup Shake hard 20 seconds, strain into 2 cocktail glasses and top each with 2 ounces Champagne. Garnish with a sprig of thyme.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Edible Weekend: Extend the weekend with two fried chicken dinners on Monday

December 13th, 2017

Whether it’s a holiday market or a breakfast pop-up, there are plenty of tasty events taking place this weekend. If you’re still hungry, extend the weekend with two fried chicken feasts at Farmhaus and Grace Meat & Three.

 

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1. Farmhaus Blue Plate Special Dinner

Early fans of Farmhaus, get ready: the Lindenwood Park restaurant is bringing back its popular blue plate special next week – only this time, for Monday supper. On Monday, diners can order the prix fixe menu, which includes a starter salad, entree and dessert. This week kicks off with blue plate favorite – chef Kevin Willmann’s fried chicken.

$29. Mon., Dec. 18 – 4:30 to 8:30 p.m., Farmhaus Restaurant, 3257 Ivanhoe Ave., St. Louis, 314.647.3800, farmhausrestaurant.com

 

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2. Family-Style Fried Chicken Dinner

Chef-owner Rick Lewis and his Grace Meat & Three crew whip up a family-style feast to benefit neighbor City Greens Market. The main event (fried chicken of course) is served with sides including a roasted beet salad, cornbread, deviled eggs, greens and grilled carrots. Local farms like Double Star Farms and Buttonwood Farms supply the ingredients. Proceeds support the market’s mission of providing equal access to quality food. Tickets available online. 

$50. Mon., Dec. 18 – 5 p.m., Grace Meat & Three, 4270 Manchester Ave., St. Louis, 314.533.2700, stlgrace.com

 

Don’t miss out. Sign up for the Edible Weekend newsletter to get the best food events of the weekend delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

Photos by Carmen Troesser

Restaurant veterans Chris Kelling, Adam Altnether will open Elmwood in Maplewood

December 12th, 2017

 

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{ the future home of Elmwood in Maplewood } 

Maplewood is poised to get another restaurant from two big names in the local culinary scene. Adam Altnether and Chris Kelling announced they’re partnering on a new eatery, Elmwood, set to debut at 2704 Sutton Ave., in the summer 2018.

“It’s going to be a modern American bistro with some global influences,” said Altnether, who most recently served as executive sous chef for the St. Louis Cardinals. He was also the former corporate executive chef for Gerard Craft’s Niche Food Group. “We definitely want to be approachable for everyone who might walk in the door, whether that’s grabbing a burger and beer at the bar after work or celebrating an anniversary.”

 

 

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{ Elmwood chef-owner Adam Altnether was most recently executive sous chef for the St. Louis Cardinals. }

 

Altnether said the kitchen will be centered around a roaring hearth, and the space will seat between 80 and 100. Construction is slated to begin in January, and will involve a gut rehab, according to Kelling, who recently left his post as general manager of Pastaria and Sardella.

Elmwood will start with dinner service, and Altnether said the possibility exists for weekend lunches and brunches. He said the name is a nod to the city’s early history – Elmwood was a final contender for the name of the city, but Maplewood won out.

Both Altnether and Kelling said Maplewood was on the top of their wish list for locations. “I only wanted to be in Maplewood,” said Kelling, who also lives in the neighborhood. “I love that strip of Sutton.”

The space at the busy intersection of Sutton Boulevard and Manchester Road most recently housed The Live Juke Joint, a dueling piano bar. Blind Tiger and Jumpin’ Jupiter also had runs in the corner building. “We love that building. It’s been at the top of our list since it’s been on the market,” Altnether said.

 

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{ Elmwood owner Chris Kelling (far right) spent much of his local career at Niche Food Group. }

 

Alnether and Kelling worked together extensively during their times at Niche Food Group. Altnether left the group in 2015, and both men said they felt it was time to open their own place.

“I’ve always had that itch,” Altnether said. “But I wasn’t willing to jump at the first opportunity. It was something that had to make sense and fit for everyone. I‘m ecstatic Chris came along, and I think we’ll be a pretty good match and make something great.”

“I’ve opened a lot of restaurants, 15-plus, and I just kind of wanted open one of my own,” Kelling said.

 

Editor’s Note: This post originally misstated the address for Elmwood. It was updated at 10 a.m. Dec. 13 with the correct address. 

Kelling photo by Greg Rannells 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Adam Altnether parts ways with Niche Food Group

• Thai Table will open next year in Maplewood

• The Live Juke Joint Dueling Piano Bar to rock out Maplewood

14 cookie recipes to bake – and bake and bake – this holiday season

December 12th, 2017

The ovens are fired up and ready to bake holiday goodies for friends, family and old Saint Nick. Whether it’s a classic holiday shortbread or triple chocolate chip, here are 14 recipes to satisfy your cookie cravings this winter.

 

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For traditional holiday confections…

1. Recipe: Springerle (Don’t have the molds? Check them out here.)

2. Recipe: Gingerbread Ornament Cookies

3. Recipe: Black-White Christmas Cookies

 

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4. Recipe: Hanukkah Hamantaschen

5. Recipe: Kourambiedes (Greek Christmas Cookies)

6. Recipe: Holiday Shortbread

 

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For contemporary cookie offerings…

7. Recipe: Frosted Peppermint Cookie Bars

8. Recipe: Cranberry Crunch Cookies

9. Recipe: Triple Chocolate Cookies

 

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10. Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Zucchini Cookies 

11. Recipe: Jazzed-Up Oatmeal Cookies

12. Recipe: Tomato, Parmesan and Pine Nut Rugelach

 

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13. Recipe: Brown Butter-Chocolate Chip Cookies

14. Recipe: Snickerdoodle Cookies

Cookie bars photo by Amrita Song, all others by Carmen Troesser

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
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• Sauce Guide to the Holiday Guide 2017 

 

 

First Look: Shake Shack in the Central West End

December 11th, 2017

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The day has finally come. Shake Shack opened for business at its first St. Louis location today, Dec. 11, at 32 N. Euclid Ave.

“I never would have predicted that Shake Shack would be the thing that would bring me home,” said founder Danny Meyer, whose Union Square Hospitality Group is best known for fine dining.

Meyer grew up in St. Louis before becoming one of New York’s most famous restaurateurs. The newest location of his internationally popular burger chain is blocks away from where he was born and where his dad lived in the Central West End.

Meyer was inspired by his childhood favorites when he originally developed Shake Shack’s menu of griddle burgers and hot dogs, crinkle-cut fries and concretes – including Steak ‘n Shake, Fitz’s and Ted Drewes. “A great Saturday was when Dad would say, ‘Let’s go to Fitz’s,’” Meyer said.

His hometown also inspired his hospitality philosophy. “I continue to believe that the secret ingredient in all of our restaurants has always been the values that I was fortunate enough to grow up with here in St. Louis, which is: people are nice,” Meyer said.

 

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St. Louis-style hospitality is one of two secret ingredients Meyer credits for Shake Shack’s success. “The other is coming from a fine dining background. Through years and years of opening restaurants like Union Square Cafe and Gramercy Tavern and Eleven Madison Park and The Modern, we know people,” he said. “We source our products just like we do in our fine-dining restaurants.”

The beef in Shake Shack’s smashed patties is all hormone-free. The concretes are made with real sugar and offer a range of local flavors including slices of Pie Oh My!, Park Avenue Coffee gooey butter cake and Winslow’s Home chocolate cookies. “I grew up with the family who started Winslow’s Home,” Meyer said.

Meyer’s attention to detail was evident just two days before opening. He didn’t choose the location or oversee construction in St. Louis, but he did make sure staff knew how much fizz should top a draft pour of Fitz’s root beer.

While walking through the local bottled beer selection – Schlafly, 4 Hands and Urban Chestnut are all represented – he took a step back and glowered at the display. “Do you see the problem I see?” he asked.

A stack of Mast Brothers chocolate for sale sat beside the beer. If they went through all the trouble of getting excellent local chocolate in the St. Louis concretes menu, Meyer explained, why would they sell Mast Bros. bars? “Not that I’m ashamed of Mast,” he said. “I’m just really proud of Askinosie.”

He had the kitchen staff bring out a huge bag of Missouri-based Askinosie chocolate chunks. “That’s really good,” he said as the staff started passing them around.

“I haven’t been sleeping – I’ve been so excited for this,” Meyer said. Shake Shack is now open Sunday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight. Here’s a first look at the highly anticipated new restaurant:

 

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Photos by Caitlin Lally 

Heather Hughes is managing editor at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Shake Shack will open Dec. 11 in the Central West End

Danny Meyer to open Shake Shack in St. Louis

 

Retreat Gastropub team will bring Yellowbelly to the CWE

December 11th, 2017

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The team behind Retreat Gastropub is set to open a new concept. Yellowbelly, a restaurant and bar focused on seafood, rum and classic cocktails, will open in the new Citizen Park Building at 4659 Lindell Blvd., in the Central West End in 2018.

Owner Travis Howard said the name of the new place denotes the yellow bellies of many fish and birds in tropical areas. It also serves as a call for patrons to try something new and different and not be a “yellow-belly.”

“We’re wanting to take inspiration from Polynesian islands,” Howard said. Rather than focusing on the beach, Yellowbelly will evoke a jungle or rainforest vibe. Howard said the food menu will have a seafood focus.

“We’ll be sort of doing the California, West Coast approach to seafood,” he said. “We’ll be keeping things a little bit lighter and doing some cold things, as well.” Dishes may include ceviche, other cold fish dishes and possibly a whole fish preparation.

“We’re trying to do a combination of pulling inspiration from the islands and the way they eat, as well as incorporation some of the Midwest produce, as well.” Howard said. No one has been tapped to helm the kitchen yet.

 

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{ from left, Tim Wiggins and Travis Howard } 

 

Howard said Retreat’s beverage manager Tim Wiggins, who is also a partner in the new venture, will put together a drinks list heavy on rum, but Yellowbelly won’t be a tiki bar.

“We’re going to be doing a lot of cocktails in that tiki style, with a lot of fun glassware and a rum focus,” Howard said, adding that a lot of tropical flavors will be utilized, such as coconut, passionfruit and pineapple. “But we want to be a neighborhood bar, so we’ll still be hitting a lot of the classic cocktails, and we’ll have a fully rounded spirits and beverage program.”

Howard said the space will have 90 to 95 seats inside with a sidewalk patio area that may seat up to 40 or so. Howard said the plan is to open sometime in mid-2018, and construction should begin in the next few months.

Photos courtesy of On Point Hospitality 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content 

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Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

December 10th, 2017

From a highly anticipated opening in Webster Groves to the closing of a restaurant on South Grand, here’s what happened last week in the STL dining scene, ICYMI.

 

The bright, airy restaurant seats about 45.

 

1. The Clover and the Bee, the new breakfast and lunch spot from the folks behind Olive & Oak, is now officially open for business at 100 W. Lockwood Ave. in Webster Groves.

 

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2. The people who brought St. Louis outdoor bar The Bronson House has a new project in store: Trust, a coffee shop and cocktail bar opening Thursday, Dec. 7.

 

The Garden on Grand is currently opened weekends at 2245 S. Grand Blvd.; a grand opening is slated for Sept. 23.

 

3. After just over a year in business, The Garden on Grand at 2245 S. Grand Ave., has shuttered. The announcement of the closure was made on the restaurant’s Facebook page.

 

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4. Coma Coffee Roasters is getting ready to expand its brand. The company, which also has a location at 1034 S. Brentwood Blvd. in Richmond Heights, plans to open a second cafe at 4013 Papin St., on the eastern edge of The Grove.

 

Don’t miss out! Follow Sauce on Facebook and Twitter for the latest Scoops in the St. Louis restaurant scene.

First Look: The Clover and the Bee in Webster Groves

December 8th, 2017

Local artist Marissa Todd painted The Clover and the Bee’s signature floral mural.

 

The Clover and the Bee, the new breakfast and lunch spot from the folks behind Olive & Oak, is now officially open for business at 100 W. Lockwood Ave. in Webster Groves.

The restaurant, which takes its name from the Emily Dickinson poem, “To Make A Prairie,” boasts a bright, airy interior that seats about 45. Emerald banquettes and gold chairs are complemented by a striking floral mural by local artist Marissa Todd, who also works as host at Olive & Oak.

The Clover and the Bee’s menu is small but well curated, with standards like house-made granola and breakfast sandwiches alongside unexpected offerings like roasted asparagus with almond pesto, romesco and a poached egg for breakfast. Lunch features a range of entree-style dishes like smoked flank steak over potatoes as well as soups, salads and a handful of sandwiches.

Beverages range from coffee (drip and espresso from a rotating selection of local and national producers), fresh juices, beer, wine (including an array of canned vinos) and even bottled cocktails – Morning Manhattan anyone?

For now, hours at The Clover and the Bee are 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily. Dinner service is in the works for sometime early next year. Here’s a first look at what to expect from Webster Groves’ highly anticipated new daytime spot:

 

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky 

Recipe: Pear and Currant Compote

December 6th, 2017

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One of my favorite items to take to holiday gatherings is an interesting jam or compote to accompany a cheese board. Consider recipes of years past: spiced carrot jam, onion jam and, if you want to go way back with me, bacon jam. I love bringing the host something delicious in a pretty glass jar, something they can put out immediately on a cheese tray or add to their holiday meal later.

This combination of pears, ginger and currants is perfect when paired with goat cheese, mascarpone or sharp cheddar. It is equally delicious on pork tenderloin sandwiches or with smoked or roasted turkey. The black pepper enhances the pungent crystallized ginger, and the texture is lovely with bits of chewy currant and ginger in each bite.

This recipe is pretty forgiving. You can use a mix of ripe and underripe pears, though you may have to add water or more orange juice to reach your desired consistency. This is closer to a compote than a jam, but you can use an immersion blender or food processor for a smoother texture.

 

Pear and Currant Compote
2 cups

3 cups diced ripe pear, peeled and cored
¾ cup sugar
½ cup currants
¼ cup minced crystallized ginger
Zest and juice of 1 medium orange
½ cup water, as needed
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

• In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, simmer the pears, currants, sugar, ginger, orange juice and zest 45 to 60 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the water as needed, until the pears are softened.
• Mash the pears with a potato masher to reach the desired consistency, and stir in the black pepper. Let cool, then store in a sealed jar up to 2 weeks.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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